Philosophical Sharing via Instagram

Jason Round

 

Can the platform be a viable tool for sharing principles?

 

 

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NEED: It’s very easy to get caught up in large-frame mobility projects for the sake of it. When people enquire about the Online Support program I often hear they WANT things such as ‘front & middle-splits, pancake, head to toe…’ and whilst all these projects develop a lot of extra movement potential, the person has rarely though about what they NEED that potential for. . These are these long-term projects which take up a lot of time, and for some people their efforts might be better placed elsewhere – for the time-being. Further, without a clear ‘movement context’ (ie what you actually want to use the range for), there’s less incentive to see the project through when the reality of the effort & consistency required hits home. This is what happened to me before I framed H2T in the grater context of manna to pike press HS. Once I had this context, I got back into things and had H2T in a few weeks. . In a movement practice we are always thinking about how our training projects will develop our overall movement potential – this ALWAYS takes precedence over number or ranges simply for the sake of them. I don’t care about how beautiful your pancake is – what can you DO with it? . To learn about the methods I used to get where I am or for full info on the Online Support program, send a message 🐒 . . . . . . . . . . #movemoremp #movemore #movementpractice #movement #movementtraining #yogacommunity #yogatribe #movementcommunity #movementculture #mobilitytraining #mobilitydrills #mobilitywork #mobilitywod #flexibilitytraining #flexibilitytraining #bodyweighttraining #martialartstraining #wushu #onlinecoaching #onlinecoach #onlinetraining #mobilitygoals #flexibilitygoals #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #bodyweightexercises #headtotoe #head2toe #sharmaclimbingbcn #barcelona

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TOXIC: Too much of anything can be toxic. Even using the same prehabilitation routine for years on end does, in my experience, lead to potential overuse-related injuries and unwarranted structural imbalances. If you are moving dynamically, your body too will change dynamically and what cures today can ill tomorrow. . Whilst aware I could do more for my own hip-mobility imbalances, if working middle-split positions I do take time for the context of internal hip-rotation too. Normally after a few minutes of isometrics for the “I peed myself” pose at low, mid, and high ranges I get dynamic with some reps and then improvised wobbles. . Whether working strength capacities or mobility ranges, it’s a good idea to have tools in the bag to mitigate against potential imbalances. Whilst, ironically, imbalance is the stuff we are made of, a few well-selected movement frames explored with awareness toward dose & variety can keep the scales tilted away from toxic 🐒 . . . . . . . . . . #movemore #movemoremp #movementpractice #movement #movementculture #culturadelmovimiento #movementexploration #movementtraining #mobilitydrills #hipmobility #mobilityexercises #flexibilitytraining #flexibilitydrills #mobilitytraining #mobilitywod #middlesplits #middlesplit #prehabilitation #movementprep #injuryprevention #martialartstraining #dancetraining #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #bodyweightexercises #bodyweighttraining #legtraining #flexibilitygoals #onlinecoaching #barcelona_cat

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INTENTION: The difference between an “exercise” and a “movement” can be seen as a matter of intention. Whilst I view exercise as repetition with the intention of fulfilling an abstracted goal (ie to build strength, mobility, aesthetics…), a movement is performed with the intent of moving from or into other movements & facilitating motion; ie, moving. . Whilst movements such as the dynamic Cossack squat and isometric “pu-bu” are great exercises for building accessible ranges in the lower-body, in changing our intention from “mobility development” to “low-gait exploration” we open an opportunity to learn how our structure supports itself through a range of “zero points” whilst moving through space. What’s more, the mobility & strength developments come for free in the process, in many cases even more successfully so. . To change intention, next time you perform the Cossack or pu-bu, give this a try: think about WHERE the movement is ultimately going. Regardless of whether you have the range or not, work with the intention of sitting on the back heel, a “zero point” which can lead to many other movements and will serve you well in low-gait explorations. It doesn’t even have to happen – the intention is enough. And while objectively the movement may look exactly the same, subjectively the difference is that between an exercise, and a movement perspective. . . . . . . . . . . #movemoremp #movemore #movementpractice #movement #movementculture #movementexploration #lowgait #culturadelmovimiento #movementismedicine #movementtraining #cossacksquat #mobility #mobilitytraining #mobilitywod #movementprep #flexibility #flexibilitytraining #flexibilitygoals #mobilitygoals #bodyweighttraining #bodyweightstrength #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #crossfitcommunity #martialartstraining #dancetraining #yogacommunity #yogatribe #legstrength #barcelona_cat

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UNFAMILIAR: Wherever a range or position feels unfamiliar, there is opportunity to develop movement potential. Whether it affects strength, mobility, joint integrity or balance and structural awareness remains a “side-effects” when the greater context is cultivation of movement experience. . As the exploration continues, however, movements that were once rich in learning inevitably become familiar and stale with diminishing returns on all levels. It’s necessary to look further, to search for the weak links, to unify and extend potential, if for nothing but the facilitation of deeper investigation. . Whilst experience in scenarios (such as disciplines) that REQUIRE more complex & unpredictable bipedal movement is irreplaceable, I still find much to be learnt from controlled explorations of the unfamiliar within the frame of training. Beyond it’s abstraction toward goals of building physical capacities, there is a diverse vocabulary to be discovered & practised. . I call this subject “Lower-body, Complexity”, a practice in its own right which produces incredible transferable benefits toward the meta-subject at hand: Movement. As such, it remains an integral element of all MoveMore: Online Support practices. To learn more about programming and guidance for your physical practice, send a PM 🐒 . . . . . . . . . . #movemoremp #movemore #movement #movementpractice #movementculture #culturadelmovimiento #movementtraining #movementexploration #movementprep #movementismedicine #mobilitytraining #mobilitydrills #mobilityexercises #flexibilitytraining #flexibilitygoals #mobilitywod #prehabilitation #lowerbodyworkout #lowerbodystrength #legstrength #legday #jointstability #legtraining #onlinecoaching #onlinetraining #bodyweightstrength #bodyweightexercises #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #barcelona_cat

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IN MOTION: For all the movements that I have practised, the “skills” gained and still in progress, for all the “cool”-looking moves and “benchmark” numbers I sought (and still seek) after, they are all shallow in comparison to the SENSATION of being IN MOTION. “Sensation is a change of quality – change of quality is a matter of movement.” Maxine Sheets-Johnstone . During a decade of bodybuilding training I valued the very visceral sensations of blood pumping, muscle contracting, skin stretching and sweat dripping – but this was concerned with the sensation of body-parts MOVING and not with being IN MOTION. Though “a change of quality” was taking place, experience tells me the limitations of those changes and qualities correlates with limitations in movement experience. . Whilst the value of “sensation” in a practice is individual, it is impossible not to encounter. Certain movement aspects do, however, dictate sensation (and thus movement) more profoundly than others, and being exposed by teachers & experience to a greater range of movement qualities has facilitated my appreciation for the subtle, sensual difference between moving, and being in-motion. . . . . . . . . . . #movemoremp #movemore #movementpractice #movement #movementculture #culturadelmovimiento #movementculturebarcelona #movementbarcelona #movementculturespain #danceculture #danceimprov #danceimprovisation #dancecommunity #movementcommunity #movementismedicine #movementmedicine #movementexploration #mobility #flexibilitytraining #flexibility #mobilitywod #bodyweighttraining #movementflow #movers #movementprep #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #physicalculture #yogacommunity #expressivemovement

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ZERO POINT: A “zero point” can be likened to a position of “familiarity”. The more positions of familiarity we develop (resting squat, handstands, QDR, bridge, low-gait balance… though they are not limited to named forms) the more movement potential we create. Imagine them as “movement nodes” – the greater their number, the more opportunity to create complexity. . “Nodes”, however, do not create movement in themselves – they FACILITATE movement by increasing OPTIONALITY whilst in motion. So, unless there is movement experience between these nodes, all we have are forms. Forms generally offer limited movement potential in and of themselves, despite often looking very impressive. To downplay the value of practising forms in a movement practice, however, would be reductive toward disrespectful. . Some forms, such as OAHS, represent a process spanning years during which the practitioner develops qualities and attributes incredibly valuable in a wider movement practice. My conclusion, then, for the physical practice of a “movement practitioner”, leads (as ever) to the recommendation of experience in both: building your nodes and putting the potential they offer into MOTION. . There are many nodes, however, which I feel return a higher level of movement potential on the effort invested than others. This sped-up, ‘Low-Gait Balance’ resource from the Online Support program represents one them. It features in the ‘Lower Body Complexity’ practice and is a staple for all practitioners. If you’d like more info about online coaching & guidance with me send a message 🐒 . . . . . . . . . . #movementculture #movementpractice #movemore #movemoremp #movementtraining #mobilitytraining #mobilityexercises #mobilitydrills #mobilitywod #flexibilitytraining #flexibilitygoals #flexibilitypost #lowerbody #balancetraining #unilateral #jointhealth #bodyweightworkout #bodyweighttraining #bodyweightexercises #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #crossfitcommunity #yogacommunity #movementcommunity #movementexploration #movementismedicine #legsday #onlinecoaching #onlinetraining #movementcoach

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WHERE ARE YOU? When I’m programming for people with Online Support, our first three months (at least) are driven by 1 question: “where are you?” I ask this of participants through the movements we explore and encourage them to ask it of themselves. . In many cases I have found people quite in the dark with regards to both their restrictions and potentials. The reason we start with a high variety of movements, then, is in an effort for greater lateral exploration. I believe this offers a greater opportunity for learning about the self & the subject through movement than a program whose main concern is “unlocking” skills or achieving certain “benchmarks”. . Don’t get me wrong – this is present in programming but it’s a structural tool rather than a determined route. In valuing movement experience over linear progression, we take more time to explore the “nooks and crannies” on the edges of the familiar. It’s a perspective which contents itself in the knowledge that if you’re following a progressive plan and putting in the work, the “side effects” will come. . Where are you? I continue to ask myself the question. The boarders are always shifting and changing, but you can only know where they are if you are going there. On the edge there’s difficulty (mental, physical, emotional), failure, and little success. Here I find what I value above all else in my practice: learning through experience. And this is the perspective and practice I share. . The Online Support program: DM or email [email protected]

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CURIOSITY is a valuable quality which can drive a movement practice. In the absence of knowledge there is the need for research, and without genuine curiosity the effort can be hollow, forced, void of passion – or non-existent. . Curiosity, however, like any other quality or characteristic, is not always a given. Depending on both the individual and the project, it may need to be ‘coaxed’ into being before it can become a driving force. Here is where inspiration can step in. . Very often only the smallest ‘permission’ is required for curiosity to flourish – something that tells you “yes, there is something of value here – this is worth spending time on”. Perhaps only an image, a word, a concept, a movement, a class, a teacher, a method… . My practice has been built on such permissions and I am thankful for every one – as much for those which have turned into dead-ends (the many) as those which have flourished (the few). They stoke the curiosity which has me spending hours, months, years on ideas which carry no guarantees other than experience of movement and what you bring with you. . Here are moments extrapolated from research on coordinative concepts shared through the Ido Portal method & Fighting Monkey Practice. With research of these being intermittent over the past year the curiosity is still enough to fuel sessions of a few hours. And until that curiosity dies, there is still much to explore.

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SOCIAL POLICING: practice in public spaces presents a valuable opportunity to expose movement perspectives to others. ‘Valuable’ because movement is ideological; it is a site of power, a political vessel, and as such subject to cultural & societal norms which obstruct, redirected, suppress, and even thwart the freedom to move in public space. This is the ‘social policing of movement’. . It is not only the planning & construction of space, the written rules, regulations and laws of the public arena. These are the obvious, the power that’s seen; the power “from above”. I am more concerned with the power that comes “from below”, whereby “individuals voluntarily control themselves by self-imposing conformity to cultural norms through self-surveillance and self-discipline, and thereby subjugate themselves”* – and others of their milieu in turn. . Power is self-righteous – it protects and perpetuates itself through its subjects. You cannot simply move how, when, or where you like – it is naivety to think otherwise. But you can offer a glimpse – perhaps give permission or even inspire. You can challenge people to question themselves and certain arbitrary judgements they may hold. For every person who awkwardly laughs, for each who eschews “the weirdo”, for all those who comment or complain, it is worth it to expose the powers of social policing consistently at play. . *Foucault in ‘Power & Bodily Practice’, Jen Pylypa . . . . . . . . . . #movemoremp #movemore #movement #movementpractice #movementexploration #movementtraining #culturadelmovimiento #movementculture #movementismedicine #improvisation #calisthenics #calisthenicsmovement #bodyweighttraining #danceculture #danceimprov #flexibilitytraining #flexibilitygoals #mobilitytraining #mobilitywod #flexibilitygoals #philosophy #socialcriticism #handstandpractice #presshandstand #handstand #locomotion #barcelona #barcelona_cat #movementculturebarcelona

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