The Science of Buy-In

The Science of Buy-In

Michael Ryan

 

 

– •Hundreds of Arm Swings• From the outside, this is unimpressive compared to the physiques and party tricks you can find in instaland, but why would this simple move be preserved throughout generations? What can the practitioner extract from this? Do you need someone else to tell you the benefits? Does citing the study or talking in scientific jargon make it more official? Or should I just say that it burns calories and works your core to get you to buy in? – Do 300 – in a row – at the same pace of the team – and tell me what it is . #learnbydoing #experience #armswings #oldschool #boringselfcare #stillamazing #instafit #absworkout #fitspo #suckers #fightingmonkey_rootlessroot

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“Ligamentous injuries to the ankle are the most common injury occurring, regardless of sport or exposure type (game or practice), a fact supported in the literature.” . “From a total of 32 relevant studies, 7 methodologically well-conducted studies were considered for this review. Balance training alone resulted in a significant risk reduction of ankle sprain injuries (RR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46-0.9, P < 0.01)” . Sources: Hübscher, M., et al. (2010). Neuromuscular Training for Sports Injury Prevention. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 42(3), 413-421. . Hootman, JM., et al. (2007). Epidemiology of Collegiate Injuries for 15 Sports: Summary and Recommendations for Injury Prevention Initiatives. Journal of Athletic Training, 42(2), 311-319. . #balance #training #ankleinjury #injuryprevention #scientificallyproven #strengthandconditioning #prehab #athletictraining #athleticdevelopment #athleticperformance #nsca #cscs #fightingmonkey_rootlessroot #athleticleg #strongfeet #kinetichygiene

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“It is accepted that noncontact ACL injury rates are higher among females than males.” – “Most noncontact ACL injuries occur when landing or decelerating on a single limb.” – “Recent neuromuscular interventions are aimed at decreasing not only ACL injuries but also other lower extremity injuries. This approach is more comprehensive and typically consists of combining different types of exercises, such as plyometrics, and balance training.” – “Three techniques that were stressed: (1) correct posture (2) jumping with soft landings (3) instant recoil preparation for the next jump. – Using the training program, women in the intervention group were able to significantly reduce noncontact ACL injuries compared with controls. Both studies highlight the importance of incorporating dynamic, biomechanically correct movements into training protocols aimed at injury prevention.” – Sources: Dai Sugimoto, et al. (2012) Compliance With Neuromuscular Training and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Reduction in Female Athletes: A Meta-Analysis. Journal of Athletic Training, 47(6), 714-723. – Hewett TE, et al. (1996) Plyometric training in female athletes: decreased impact forces and increased hamstring torques. Am J Sports Med, 24, 765–773.

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“Typically during single-leg landing, pivoting, or deceleration, all common ACL injury mechanisms, the female athlete allows the ground reaction force to control the direction of motion of the lower extremity joints. This motion is especially evident at the knee, which is not only influenced by direct external moments but also by the ankle and hip internal moments. Lack of coordinated muscular control of the lower extremity may lead to high forces and potentially irrevocable loads on the knee ligaments.” . “Education for dynamic control of knee motion may be achieved through movements that challenge the neuromuscular system.” . Sources: Hewett, T. E., et al. (1999). The Effect of Neuromuscular Training on the Incidence of Knee Injury in Female Athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 27(6), 699-706. . Lloyd, D. G. (2001). Rationale for Training Programs to Reduce Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Australian Football. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 31(11), 645-654. . @ilwomen @stxwlax @perform_better @nikewomen

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“Sports that limit or restrict player contact, such as soccer, basketball, and women’s lacrosse, still have a majority of their game injuries associated with player contact.” . “For both practices and games, player contact accounted for the majority of injuries (58.0% in games, 41.6% in practices).” . Programs for non-contact sports should still expose athletes to movement situations that require strategic contact with a partner. It might also be good if teammates were friends and could play interactive/physical games with each other outside of scrimmage or game day, but science hasn’t proven that. #justsaying . Source: Hootman, JM., et al. (2007). Epidemiology of Collegiate Injuries for 15 Sports: Summary and Recommendations for Injury Prevention Initiatives. Journal of Athletic Training, 42(2), 311-319.

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. THE 🦇 POSITION . “Training programs that incorporate safe levels of varus-valgus stress can better prepare an athlete for more multidirectional sport activities, which can improve performance and reduce the risk of lower extremity injury.” . Sources: Hewett, T. E., et al. (1999). The Effect of Neuromuscular Training on the Incidence of Knee Injury in Female Athletes. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 27(6), 699-706. . Lloyd, D. G. (2001). Rationale for Training Programs to Reduce Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Australian Football. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 31(11), 645-654. . #fightingmonkey_rootlessroot #batposition #batsquat #athleticleg #athleticdevelopment #prehab #multidirectionaltraining #changedirections #kneevalgus #kneevarus #torsionalstress #rotationalpower #elasticrecoil #stretching #coordination #strength #conflicting #polarity #fieldathlete #lacrosse #soccer #football #rugby #baseball #tennis #jiujitsu #strengthandconditioning

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“The muscles that power vertebrate locomotion are associated with springy tissues, both within muscle and in connective tissue elements such as tendons. These springs share in common the same simple action: they stretch and store elastic strain energy when force is applied to them and recoil to release energy when force decays. Although this elastic action is simple, it serves a diverse set of functions, including metabolic energy conservation, amplification of muscle power output, attenuation of muscle power input, and rapid mechanical feedback that may aid in stability. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms and importance of biological springs in locomotion has advanced significantly, and it has been demonstrated that elastic mechanisms are essential for the effective function of the muscle motors that power movement.” . “Stretch shortening cycle actions may produce efficient muscle outputs which can be very different from the conditions of isolated preparations (where activation levels are held constant and storage of strain energy is limited).” . Sources: Roberts, T. J., & Azizi, E. (2011). Flexible mechanisms: the diverse roles of biological springs in vertebrate movement. Journal of Experimental Biology, 214(3), 353-361. . Komi, P. V. (2000). Stretch-shortening cycle: a powerful model to study normal and fatigued muscle. Journal of Biomechanics, 33(10), 1197-1206.

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